Thursday, April 11, 2013

Marlins Watch: Three Nights In

Oh boy.  How ugly will it get?

Forget fans putting paper bags over their heads.  Forget fans getting ejected for not producing ID (you might expect that in Arizona, but not South Florida!?!).  The Marlins may face the biggest public criticisms this year over their attendance reporting this year.


 
Apparently, the team didn't even announce yesterday's crowd:




Unfortunately for the Marlins, the league requires them to provide some attendance number...and for their third game of the year, they said 14,222.
 
Which may not be the most accurate stat:
 
UPDATE: It wasn't an accurate stat - the number was later amended to 13,810.

And it's probably not just the Marlins sensative to the fallout....the Miami Dolphins, hoping for a public handout to presumably prevent them from blackmailing the city and threatening to leave, are carefully measuring the public sentiment toward stadium subsidies. 

The good news for the Dolphins is Governor Rick Scott seems to be on-board with the handout, and critical Miami-Dade residents will have just a few weeks to mount an opposition effort before the stadium referendum could go to ballot.

Of course, if there's any silver lining in the Marlins' episode, it's that at least the Rays won't be finishing in last-place in MLB attendance this year.

7 comments:

  1. Funny, I've often wondered why the Rays didn't "tweak" their attendance numbers too. The Red Sox certainly did, during their (mostly phony) sellout streak. Of course, for the Rays, the answer is, they wanted the Trop to be empty.

    Curious too Miami can get something on the ballot in a couple of weeks, and the citizens of St. Petersburg are being denied the same privilege at every turn.

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  2. The Red Sox "tweak" is a common one - calling a near-sellout a sellout. But in the last two years, as demand dropped, the Red Sox really did sell just about all their tickets at face value - just to brokers and the secondary market. But you are right - teams are allowed lots of liberty in how they "tweak" their reported numbers.

    As for the Rays, it was the team that withdrew its referendum in 2008 - with no appetite for a publicly-funded stadium here right now, its not in the team's best interest to force a referendum. Dolphins may meet a similar fate.

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    1. LOL, thanks for saying what we already know! Report something we don't know...

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  3. Isn't that a picture from their old stadium? Was the tweet a joke?

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    1. Noah couldn't tell the difference anyways! That's what happens when "binge sports fans" try to sell a story to "sports junkies"!

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  4. The bit about Rick Scott is hilarious. Transfer of wealth is an anathema indeed, but not if it's an upward thing.

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  5. Regarding:
    =====================================================
    The good news for the Dolphins is Governor Rick Scott seems to be on-board with the handout, and critical Miami-Dade residents will have just a few weeks to mount an opposition effort before the stadium referendum could go to ballot.
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    If the Miami-Dade residents actually need to mount an opposition after the obscenity/tragedy of the building of the new Marlins Stadium (at $500 million of taxmpayer money), then the Miami-Dade residents need to all get 'brain' tested. This stadium referendum, I predict, will be voted down by about 70%/30% vote.

    The real tragedy is what happens after the Miami-Dade citizens clearly show that they do not want to publicly fund improvements for the Dolphins stadium. Back room shenanigans will continue to go on to hi-jack the funding decision from the citizens to the local pols, and, more than likely, the taxpayers will wind up holding the bag once again!

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